Objects of crime to go on public display for the first time

MoL to display items connected to Great Train Robbery
Nicola Sullivan
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Objects relating to some of the UK’s most notorious crimes will be exhibited to the public for the first time at the Museum of London

Items to be displayed at the exhibition Crime Museum Uncovered are connected to crimes such as the Great Train Robbery in 1963 and the Millennium Dome diamond heist in 2000. 

The exhibition, which opens in October, will also examine the challenges of policing in London, such as terrorism, espionage, counterfeiting and narcotics.

Among the artefacts to be displayed are: a forensic kit used by detectives visiting crime scenes; counterfeiting and forgery implements; and the personal possessions of Ronnie Biggs and others involved in the Great Train Robbery.
 
All objects have been taken from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum, which was created by police officers. Established in 1875, the museum is hidden at New Scotland Yard and the items on display have only been seen by police professionals and invited guests.
  
Sharon Ament, the director of the Museum of London, said: “Crime Museum Uncovered will use select objects from this extraordinary, hidden collection to consider the changing nature of crime and advances in detection over the last 140 years.

"Through focusing on people – victims, perpetrators and police officers – we’ll use real objects to explore the human stories behind some of the UK’s most well-known crimes, personalising what is so often depersonalised. And in doing so, we’ll confront how, as a society, we respond when normality is shattered, lives are torn apart and we need to rebuild.”

Bernard Hogan-Howe, the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service, said: "The artefacts held in the museum will provide visitors with an insight into the evolution of crime investigation and criminal justice. The public will view exhibits from some of the most complex and indeed notorious criminal investigations carried out by the Met, and discover how such crimes were solved.”


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