How have you been engaging with schools during Covid?

Read the latest Museums Journal voxpop
Share
Carolyn Foran
Museums education officer, Glasgow Museums

“While we are unable to accommodate school visits, we are developing learning resources that are available on social media and our website. Topics covered range from Glasgow’s connection with the slave trade to critical studies in art. We filmed a ‘virtual visit’ to Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum on the theme of ancient Egypt. Instead of delivering an in-venue teachers’ CPD programme, we created themed notes. In October, we hosted an online session, Mindfulness through Art Techniques.”

Frances Jeens
Interim director, Jewish Museum London

“Schools have been a priority, as they were the first audience that reached out asking for help as lockdown began. We teach complex topics – religion, racism, migration and grief. Our learning theory is that these are best taught by educators, rather than by independent study. So we needed to find a way to continue facilitated learning. We launched virtual classrooms in May and had facilitated more than 600 students by July. It’s been a huge success for income generation and engagement.”

Kate Fellows
Head of learning and access, Leeds Museums and Galleries

“Covid has brought into focus the close relationship we have with schools via our membership scheme and wider programmes. During lockdown, schools wanted home-based content via MyLearning.org and #MuseumFromHome YouTube films using accessioned objects from our loans boxes. The focus is now on recovery support, co-creation of cultural curricula and blended learning (real with digital). Objects are powerful learning tools, so it can’t all be online.”

Nia Williams
Director of learning and engagement, Amgueddfa Cymru (National Museum Wales)

Amgueddfa Cymru is the largest provider of learning outside the classroom in Wales. We’ve worked with the School Consortia to develop new resources. Our most popular workshops have been adapted into virtual free of charge programmes, delivered to classrooms across Wales through Microsoft Teams. Minecraft your Museum, a competition developed during lockdown, was facilitated in partnership with Hwb, the digital platform for learning and teaching in Wales. It focused on enabling children to create their ideal museum using Minecraft gaming software. The quality of entries was incredible, and a short video created showcases the winners.

Advertisement

Leave a comment

You must be signed in to post a comment.

Discover

Advertisement