Children on the British Museum's Passport to the Afterlife workshop. Credit: Fyfephoto.com

Henley Review of Cultural Education

Rebecca Atkinson, 28.02.2012
Key recommendations
Darren Henley, the managing director of Classic FM, has made a number of recommendations in his Review of Cultural Education.

Click here to read the full Museums Journal story on the review

Recommendations include:

Broad cultural education for all children
There should be a minimum level of cultural education that a child should expect to receive during his or her schooling as a whole.

A national plan
The government should develop a single national cultural education plan.

Arms-length bodies working together as a partnership
Arts Council England, the Heritage Lottery Fund, the British Film Institute, the Big Lottery Fund and English Heritage should work together as the Cultural Education Partnership Group (CEPG) to ensure that their individual strategies/plans in the area of cultural education cohere in a way that adds up to a single over-arching strategy in line with the government’s stated ambitions.

A cultural education passport
The CEPG should consider establishing a new cultural education passport scheme for children between the ages of five and 19, which records all of their in-school and out of school cultural activities, enabling parents, carers and teachers to understand what each child has achieved and to plug any gaps in knowledge and experience.

A cultural education website
A single destination website should be created, bringing all cultural education resources together in one easily accessible place online.

New local partnerships
Rolling a structure out across the cultural education spectrum to enable meaningful partnerships on the ground across different art forms and using all of the expertise and venues that are available in a given area.

Managing closer partnerships
More can be done - both by cultural organisations and by schools - to foster closer working partnerships.

Connecting teachers to industry
A new scheme should be developed across the entire cultural sector to allow teachers to remain in touch with relevant professional developments outside of education.

Training teachers
Greater focus should be placed on demonstrating both to newly-qualified teachers and to experienced teachers the benefits and value of cultural education to children and young people.

New qualifications for cultural practitioners
New qualifications aimed at cultural practitioners who also work in the education field should continue to be developed, as these qualifications professionalise and give greater recognition to this part of the workforce.

National Schools Culture Week
In partnership with commercial sponsors, the government should consider the introduction of a National Schools Culture Week across England.

Cultural education ambassadors
It is vitally important that government maintains a strong relationship with cultural practitioners, so it is suggested that an advisory group of top level practitioners, who are household names and well respected for their particular areas of expertise, be recruited to champion cultural education to the public at large.

Download the full Henley Review of Cultural Education report (pdf)

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